Meet our #WomanCrushWednesday of the week- Dr. Lindsey Sward, MD, Obstetrics & Gynecology!

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“Also, find good female mentors. They are worth their weight in gold

 

Name:  Lindsey Sward

Specialty: General obstetrics & gynecology

Undergraduate education: University of Arkansas

Medical school: UAMS

Residency: UAMS

Fellowship: n/a

Hometown: Conway, AR

 

Tell us about yourself?

I am starting my 4thyear as staff here at UAMS and my 2ndfull year as the OB/Gyn clerkship director. After I finished residency, I did two years of private practice before coming back “home” to UAMS.

What are some fun facts about you?

I have an almost 5 year old son named Sam who is my constant sidekick when I’m not at work. I am married to my husband Erik of 8 years who happens to be the brother of my best friend from my medical school class. We also have a chocolate lab named Layla and a miniature dachshund named Henry.

I was a competitive gymnast in my younger days (until I tore my ACL!) and then a Razorback cheerleader in college.

What do you love about surgery? Your field?

I love that, in surgery, I get to tackle a problem head-on and fix it. There is a lot of instant gratification in that. I also love that I get to use creative problem solving skills in the OR. And it’s always fun seeing patients back postoperatively; they are almost always so appreciative.

My field is the best! I get to take care of women all day long, and they definitely make the best patients. I also love the diversity that OB/Gyn offers – I get to spend time on Labor & Delivery delivering babies, time in the OR, and time in the clinic building relationships with patients. Every day is different for me, and I love that.

Did you have a career before medical school?

No

What brought you to LR?

I was born and raised in Arkansas and did medical school and residency here. I really missed UAMS during my brief stint in private practice and couldn’t wait to come back! I love my colleagues, and I also love teaching residents and medical students, so UAMS is a perfect fit for me.

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?

I like to spend time with my little family. I also enjoy running. I am an avid reader and can devour a book – fiction or non-fiction – in a weekend.

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?

Be confident! Don’t let anyone tell you that you aren’t as good with your hands as your male colleagues. Also, if something doesn’t come easy, like a particular technical skill, don’t feel defeated. Surgical skills, just like any other skills in life, get better with practice. Keep working at it.

Also, find good female mentors. They are worth their weight in gold.

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Meet our #WomanCrushWednesday of the week- Dr. Lindsey Sward, MD, Obstetrics & Gynecology!

This week’s #WomenCrushWednesday is honoring our brilliant, hardworking, and inspiring co-founders and Presidents – Madison Lampkin and Meredith McKinney, who recently matched into Otolaryngology at UTHSC and Obstetrics and Gynecology at UAMS!

In honor of their inspiring dedication to promoting women in surgical fields, this week’s #WCW is WISE co-founders and presidents – Madison Lampkin and Meredith McKinney, 4th year medical students at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. WISE officers and members would like to thank Madison and Meredith on their incredible leadership and congratulate them on their outstanding match day results!

WISE would also like to congratulate all of our UAMS seniors on their match day results! We can’t wait to see what these amazing women will accomplish next!

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Madison Lampkin

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Specialty: Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery (also known as ENT or Ear, Nose, and Throat)
Residency Program: University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in Memphis, TN
Undergraduate education: Southern Methodist University in Dallas, TX, B.A. in Psychology
Hometown: Fort Smith, AR

Tell us about yourself?

I was born in Dallas, TX while my father was in medical school, then we moved to Nashville, TN for his residency/fellowship, then we moved to Fort Smith, AR, where I spent the majority of my childhood. I am the oldest of four children – there is a 19-year age difference between me and my youngest sibling! I grew up playing sports – soccer, tennis, and cheerleading. I have always loved to paint, draw, and work with clay/pottery! My husband and I are the proud parents of 2 dogs – a coonhound and a German shepherd.

What are some fun facts about you?

  1. I have a 6-year-old sister and a 6-year-old aunt.
  2. My family owns a salsa company – “My Brother’s Salsa”
  3. I come from a family of doctors: my father and grandfather are nephrologists, my uncle is a general surgeon, and my aunt is in my medical school class (matched into internal medicine).

What are your hobbies?

I like to spend time with my dogs, go to used book stores and farmers’ markets with my husband, shop antique shops and flea markets with my mom, and go to spin classes and hot yoga with my girlfriends. I also like to read! My go-to genre is thriller/horror/mystery, but when in doubt – Harry Potter.

What do you love about surgery? And why did you choose your specialty?

What I love about surgery is that it gives you the opportunity to heal people with your hands. It is very rewarding to see a lesion then remove it or see a defect then correct it.

I chose otolaryngology/head and neck surgery for several reasons. The head and neck are very important regions of your body. Not only does it house your brain, but it is also how you interface with the world. It is your face/identity, your senses of smell, taste, and hearing, your facial expressions, your voice/speech, your airway, your balance, and your ability to chew/swallow. This is how we experience life and to have the opportunity to help someone in this way, in my opinion, is the highest honor and privilege.

Tell us about where you are going for residency and what are you looking forward to most in residency?

I am going to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in Memphis, TN for ENT residency. There are 4 residents in my PGY-1 class. Throughout the 5 years of residency, we will rotate through several different hospitals: Regional One Health, VA Medical Center, Methodist University Hospital, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, and Baptist Memorial Hospital. I am excited to start in July! I look forward to caring for patients and learning to be a surgeon.

Is there anyone you want to thank for their support/encouragement/mentorship that helped you be who you are today?

I am thankful for my parents – for always encouraging me and believing in me! They have always told me “you can do anything you put your mind to.” I wouldn’t be where I am today without them. I am so thankful for my wonderful husband who has been there with me every step of the way. He is my rock. I am so thankful for my friends – they always know how to make me laugh and make me feel like a rock star! I am thankful for Dr. Katie Kimbrough for helping us start WISE and for being a wonderful role model. And I am so grateful for my advisor Dr. Abby Nolder whose guidance and support helped me match into ENT!

What’s one thing you wish you knew before you started medical school or fourth year?  I wish I knew that I could do it and do it well! 

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?

Live BOLDLY! Be yourself – and don’t apologize for it! And above all else, remember the “Golden Rule” – treat others as you wish to be treated.

Meredith McKinney

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Specialty: OBGYN

Residency Program: UAMS!

Undergraduate education: Hendrix College

Hometown: Batesville, AR

Tell us about yourself? 

Hi I’m Meredith, I’m 26 (today is actually my birthday! Lol) and I grew up in the small town of Batesville, AR. When I was 12 I injured my knee playing soccer and ended up having two knee surgeries, which first sparked my interest in surgery.  As an M1, I helped Dr. Kimbrough jump start the first Summer in Surgery program, which helped me realize my passion for being in the operating room.  I actually didn’t know I would like OBGYN until I started on my 3rd year clerkship, when I was quite surprised to find myself falling in love with it.  And the rest is history!

What are some fun facts about you?

  1. Pizza is my all-time favorite food (but no veggies on it)
  2. I collect pins from Disney World
  3. I just adopted a new dog named Goldie! She’s a schnauzer mix

What are your hobbies?

I love taking Goldie on walks, hanging out with my friends, dancing, trying new restaurants and breweries around town.  I love working out and have recently gotten really into Clique Cycle!

What do you love about surgery? And why did you choose your specialty?

I have always loved surgery because it allows me to use my hands and fix a problem for my patients.  That is something really unique to all surgical fields.  I specifically chose OBGYN because we operate a lot, but we also have a lot of continuity of care with our patients.  I like the idea of following a woman through her whole life, as she just needs annual exams, to when she is having babies, to later on down the line when she might need a hysterectomy.  I also really love getting to deliver babies 🙂

Tell us about where you are going for residency and what are you looking forward to most in residency?

I am happy to be staying at UAMS for residency!  I am really excited to start learning how to operate and do procedures myself.  Med school is a lot of observing and taking notes, and I am excited to finally get to start learning how to be an OBGYN, what I plan to do for the rest of my life!

Is there anyone you want to thank for their support/encouragement/mentorship that helped you be who you are today?

Oh yes! I have had tremendous support along my journey, from my parents, Dr. Kimbrough, Dr. Clardy, a lot of my friends and family.  And my Co-President Madison of course!

What’s one thing you wish you knew before you started medical school or fourth year?

I started medical school right out of college, and I think we are all a little naïve coming into it about how much work it will take.  I would 100% do it again though, but I wish I had a little more information about board exams and different specialties (besides ortho/gen surg – maybe I would have found OBGYN sooner!).

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?

Never let anybody tell you that you can’t do something, especially become a surgeon.  You can have whatever kind of life you want, and nobody makes their career the same as someone else.  A lot of women are discouraged from going into surgery because they think they can’t have a family or be a good wife or mother.  I’m not to that stage of life yet, but I believe you can be all of those things if you want (and we have some great female surgeons that came before us demonstrating this)!

I’m sticking around at UAMS as an OBGYN intern, so please feel free to contact me with questions about OBGYN, Summer in Surgery, or med school/life in general!

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Meet our #WomanCrushWednesday – Dr. Analiz Rodriguez, MD, PhD, fellowship-trained Neurosurgical Oncologist at UAMS!

Dr Analiz Rodriguez MD, PhD

“Surgery is a team sport.  Studies have shown that diverse teams with multiple perspectives function better.  Hardcore, talented surgeons can wear heels and a ponytail. We need to change the image of what a surgeon ‘looks’ like.”

Name:  Analiz Rodriguez MD PhD
Specialty: Neurosurgery
Undergraduate education: New College of Florida
Graduate education: Case Western Reserve University
Medical school: Case Western Reserve University
Residency: Wake Forest University
Fellowship: City of Hope National Medical Center
Hometown: Cape Coral, FL

Tell us about yourself?  “I am a neurosurgical oncologist who specializes in taking care of brain tumor patients. I am a surgeon-scientist so along with my clinical work, I run a research laboratory. I was a big science fair/math team nerd growing up who also wanted to be a neurosurgeon. I entered the MD/PhD program and shadowed a neurosurgeon very early on. I loved the dichotomy in neurosurgery between “hard” (i.e. drilling bone) and “soft” (i.e. delicate nuanced movements underneath a microscope). In residency, I most enjoyed taking care of brain tumor patients. Since these patients oftentimes have a short survival, the care you give them is very impactful. My goal for both my clinical and research work is to give people as much time and quality of life as possible.Screen Shot 2018-01-31 at 11.32.33 AM.png

What are some fun facts about you?  “I have an artistic side. When I was in high school, my science teacher was shocked when I got second place in a statewide poetry competition.  She had no idea I wrote poetry. I also love crafts (like amigurumi) and cooking.”

What do you love about surgery? Your field?  “Neurosurgery is one of the newest surgical fields. The surgical techniques continue to evolve, and patient management is very complex. In my subspecialty, neurosurgical oncology, we deal with some of the most aggressive tumors of the human body. You have to try to outsmart the tumor without hurting the person. Every day you are trying to prolong precious lives and you have to keep going despite setbacks. It’s a field that attracts people who like challenges.”

Did you have a career before medical school?  “No, I went straight through training.”

What brought you to LR?  “As the only medical center in Arkansas, we really get to impact a large group of people. I am the only fellowship trained neurosurgical oncologist in the state right now.  Many studies have shown that when cancer patients have access to specialty care, they do better.  Given that a good proportion of people live in rural communities, we have to be creative to ensure they have access to care.  Our neurosurgery chairman, Dr. JD Day,  has a vision to provide the best quality care to people in this state which was in line with my personal values as a physician. I also really liked the research community I encountered during my interview.  There’s a lot of genuine southern hospitality here.”

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?  “I am a cinephile and enjoy plays/performances.  I love French literature, museums, traveling and trying new restaurants.  My favorite activities to decompress are watching mindless, fun TV and shopping.”

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?  “There are many unique hurdles that you may encounter being a woman in surgery.  However, the last thing anyone needs is another woman blocking their path.  Surgery can be a “dog eat dog” environment so don’t carry a big chip on your shoulder or get bitter.  I think we need to promote sisterhood rather than competition.  Lastly, just be yourself. People feel pressure to fulfill stereotypes or to take on ‘masculine’ characteristics. Surgery is a team sport.  Studies have shown that diverse teams with multiple perspectives function better.  Hardcore, talented surgeons can wear heels and a ponytail.  We need to change the image of what a surgeon ‘looks’ like.

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https://uamshealth.com/news/2017/08/15/neurosurgeon-analiz-rodriguez-m-d-ph-d-joins-uams/

Follow us on Twitter: @WISEUAMS
Follow us on Instagram: @wise.uams

Dr. Ronda S. Henry-Tillman, MD, FACS

Meet this week’s #WomanCrushWednesday, Dr. Ronda S. Henry-Tillman, MD, FACS, a fellowship-trained Breast Surgical Oncologist who currently serves as the division chief of Breast Surgical Oncology in the College of Medicine surgical department at UAMS!

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“Continuously remember to stay focused and believe in you.  During your journey, you will face stumbling blocks, set-backs, and challenges but always remember to stand tall and never waiver.”

Name:  Ronda S. Henry-Tillman, MD, FACS
Specialty: Breast Surgical Oncology
Undergraduate education: San Diego State University
Graduate education: University of California Irvine School of Medicine
Medical school: University of California San Diego School of Medicine
Residency: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Fellowship: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Hometown: Blytheville, AR

Tell us about yourself?
I currently serve as the division chief of Breast Surgical Oncology in the College of Medicine Department of Surgery at UAMS and Muriel Balsam Kohn Chair in Breast Surgical Oncology. I became a member of the UAMS faculty in 1998 and hold the position of professor in the Department of Surgery and co-leader of the Breast Tumor Disease Oriented Committee in the UAMS Cancer Institute.  Previously, I held the position of director for the UAMS Cancer Control program and was instrumental in the development of the university’s mobile mammography program.  As a board certified surgeon, I have a passion for research and have focused my efforts on colorectal and breast cancer disparities in underserved populations.  In 2016, I was appointed by Gov. Asa Hutchinson to the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Commission and was elected to chairman in 2017 I am member of the Breast Cancer Control Advisory Board as well as the Pulaski County health officer for the Arkansas State Board of Health.  I hold a number of national memberships and I am engaged in a host of professional activities.

What are some fun facts about you?
I am an avid tennis player as well as an enthusiastic fan.     

What do you love about surgery? Your field?
What I love most about surgery is the ability to provide direct patient care as well as the dedicated focus required of me in the OR.
I am continuously elated at the ever changing innovations and the progression made in my field.   

Did you have a career before medical school?
I worked for a number of years as a clerk for a major grocery store chain before deciding to change my focus to the medical profession.

What brought you to LR?
Acceptance into the residency program as well as family brought me to Little Rock.

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?
I truly enjoy spending time with my family, cheering my children on during their sporting events, and attending church service.       

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?
Continuously remember to stay focused and believe in you.  During your journey, you will face stumbling blocks, set-backs, and challenges but always remember to stand tall and never waiver.             

 

Dr. Rachel L. Slotcavage, MD, Endocrine Surgeon at UAMS

Meet this week’s #WomanCrushWednesday, Dr. Rachel L. Slotcavage, MD, a fellowship-trained Endocrine Surgeon!

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“Never compete with anyone other than yourself – your dreams and goals are yours alone, and if you achieve them, you have been successful.” – Dr. Rachel L. Slotcavage, M.D.

Name: Rachel L. Slotcavage, M.D.
Specialty: Endocrine Surgery
Undergraduate education: Bucknell University
Medical school: University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Residency: Cooper University Hospital
Fellowship: Cleveland Clinic
Hometown: North Catasauqua, PA

Tell us about yourself?
I was born and raised in North Catasauqua, PA – between my last name and my town, spelling was a huge hurdle early in life! I received my B.S. at Bucknell University, then went on to earn my M.D. and complete my post-doc at the University of Pennsylvania. Believe it or not, I desperately wanted to be an Orthopaedic Surgeon, but the Match had other plans. Therefore my training was somewhat fractured. I did my internship at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA, then my General Surgery residency at Cooper University Hospital (now of Rowan University) in Camden, NJ – the most dangerous city in the country makes for interesting Trauma training! It was very clear to me that I wanted to do something else with life, and fell in love with Endocrine Surgery in my PGY-II year. After spending a year working with stem cells in the lab, I returned as a PGY-III to find the field was just as exciting to me as it ever had been, and I pursued my Endocrine Surgery fellowship at The Cleveland Clinic, matching into one of 26 spots in the country.

What are some fun facts about you?

  1. I didn’t Match (more than once).
  2. I played high school football – I was a left tackle and played on the kickoff and punt return teams.
  3. I am city girl through and through – my heart will probably always be in Philadelphia. I’d actually never had a yard until moving to Arkansas, and promptly hired someone else to…do whatever it is one does with grass.

What do you love about surgery? Your field?
I love the instant gratification of removing a tumor or stopping a bleeding vessel. I love that I can make people better with my two hands. Surgery offers an intimate connection with your patient’s body that no other field offers! Regarding Endo Surg specifically, I love that I do a lot of diagnostics, like performing my own biopsies and ordering complex lab work, prior to the OR – I get to practice the art of medicine, not just the technical aspects of surgery. Thyroid and parathyroid surgery are very oriented towards fine details and meticulousness, which suits me very well. Also, my colleagues are delightfully nerdy – and I mean that as the highest possible compliment because I fit in perfectly!

Did you have a career before medical school?
Not unless you count working part time as a lifeguard at the University gym through all 4 years of medical school!

What brought you to Little Rock?
Short answer: the two physician job search! My husband is a neurologist, and we are both passionate about medical education. We needed to find an institution that presented good opportunities for both our unique mutual interest as well as my uncommon specialty.

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What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?
I am a devoted road cyclist and currently training for a time trial in March. I sometimes pretend to be a runner, and my preferred distance is the 10k. I’m also a huge foodie, which is likely how the above two hobbies came to be!

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?
No one can do it all. Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you can. It’s all about balance – at times you will be a better doctor, at times a better wife or mother, at times a better housekeeper, and at times you won’t get out of bed on a Saturday! Be prepared to acknowledge that you aren’t perfect, but still strive to beat yesterday every day. Never compete with anyone other than yourself – your dreams and goals are yours alone, and if you achieve them, you have been successful. No matter what, it takes a village – your family, significant other, friends, and colleagues – but never forget that you can’t take care of others if you don’t take care of YOU!

We are excited to announce…

… WISE is now an Education Sponsor of CSurgeries!

CSurgeries: The Only Peer-Reviewed Surgical Video Journal

Screen Shot 2018-01-04 at 9.02.44 PM.pngScreen Shot 2018-01-04 at 8.59.31 PM.pngCreated by surgeons for the surgical community, CSurgeries is an online surgical video journal dedicated to creating a centralized source of brief, peer-reviewed medical videos that are accessible to a wide audience, including students and professionals in all surgical disciplines. CSurgeries aims to be a useful resource for teaching basic and complex surgical techniques, and a venue where surgical innovations can be shared across specialties. Enhance your learning by getting video publications delivered directly to your inbox.

Become a member, publish videos, and contribute today!

Contact for questions: editor@csurgeries.com

 

Dr. Kyla Shelton, MD, MS, RPVI, Vascular Surgeon at UAMS

Meet this week’s #WomanCrushWednesday, Dr. Kyla Shelton, MD, a vascular surgeon who recently returned home to Little Rock from University of Cincinnati to join the vascular team at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS). She is the first and only female vascular surgeon in the state of Arkansas.

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Name:  Kyla R. Shelton, MD, MS, RPVI

Specialty: Vascular Surgery

Undergraduate education: University of Central Arkansas

Graduate education: University of Central Arkansas

Medical school: UAMS

Residency: UAMS

Hometown: DeWitt, AR

Tell us about yourself? I was born and raised in DeWitt, AR. I always knew I wanted to be a surgeon. My dad is a diesel/tractor mechanic and when I was a kid, he gave me my first “hemodynamics” lecture when he was explaining to me how you have to have pressure to have flow in some engine hydraulic thing.  I got my BS in biology at UCA and then MS with an emphasis in molecular biology at UCA. I went to medical school at UAMS. I got interested in vascular surgery during medical school while working in a lab for a vascular surgeon here at UAMS. We were studying the pathophysiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice. When I applied for the integrated vascular surgery residency, there were only 19 positions in the US and I matched here at UAMS. I completed my vascular surgery residency in 2015. I have spent the past two years practicing vascular surgery at the University of Cincinnati. I just got back to UAMS last month and I am happy to be back. I met my husband in medical school and we were married during residency. He is almost done with his urogynocology fellowship. We had two kids during our two years in Cincinnati. My son is 2.5 years old and my daughter is 15 months old.

 

What are some fun facts about you?

  1. I did not get into medical school the first time and now I am the first and only female vascular surgeon in the state of Arkansas
  2. I was on a shooting team in high school.
  3. I DON’T do snot! It is my husband’s job to handle our kids’ snot.

What do you love about surgery? Your field?

I love surgery for the same reasons everyone else does. As for vascular surgery, I like that many times it is not straight forward. There are multiple medical and surgical options in treating vascular disease and you have to pick what is best for that patient, whether it is endovascular (like stenting) or open surgery (like bypasses). These patients also tend not to be the healthiest (diabetes, smokers, etc), so that adds another level of complexity.  Vascular surgery is just awesome! There’s nothing like a 9 cm abdominal aortic aneurysm thumping in your face during surgery or like putting a clamp on the carotid artery that feeds the brain while you clean out the gunk in the artery.

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Did you have a career before medical school? Just a career student.

What brought you to LR? This is home. And it is a chance to give back to the state that gave me so many opportunities.

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital? Eat, travel, wine/beer…the usual.

 

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?

It is very important for women to be supportive of each other. We tend to be each other’s worst and harshest critic. It is also good to recognize the gender discrepancies in surgery. This allows you to arm yourself with the tools you need to become successful and advance your career. However, it is just as important not to dwell on those discrepancies. This can have a negative effect on all the hard work you have done and be counterproductive.

Lastly, get exposed to surgery early! Anyone interested in vascular surgery please email me or come by my office. You can do some shadowing, get involve in research, etc. There is also a student organization within the Society of Vascular Surgery and they give out scholarships every year to students to pay for them to attending the national meeting.

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Dr. Kyla Shelton and her family.

 

Dr. Alexis White, MD, Obstetrician and Gynecologist at UAMS

Meet this week’s #WomanCrushWednesday, Dr. Alexis White, MD, an Obstetrician and Gynecologist that recently finished her residency at University of Missouri-Kansas City and decided to pursue her love of academic medicine at University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).

Dr. WhiteDr. Alexis White with her husband, an Emergency Medicine physician at Baptist Hospital in Conway, Arkansas. 

Name:  Alexis White
Specialty: OB/GYN
Undergraduate education: Arkansas Tech University, majored in Mechanical Engineering
Medical school: UAMS
Residency: University of Missouri-Kansas City

Hometown: Greenwood, Arkansas

What are some fun facts about you?
I fainted when I say my first vaginal birth when I was 15.
I have been skydiving.
My husband and I know how to swing dance.
I married my high school sweetheart.

What do you love about surgery? Your field?
With surgery you have the opportunity to really see and address the source of a problem and fix it. I chose OBGYN because I love taking care of women.  In OBGYN, surgical opportunities arise when you need to remove a uterus that causes problems, or bring life into the world! How cool is that!

What brought you to Little Rock?
I realized in my 4th year of residency that I really liked teaching so I wanted to stay in academic medicine.


What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?

My hobbies include knitting and baking. My husband and I love to travel. We are foodies and love trying new foods/restaurants.

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?
At home, practice doing things with your hands, like playing an instrument or knitting or crochet, or wood working.  This will help you with muscle memory and obtaining a tactile sensation of using instruments. 

 

 

Dr. Abby Nolder, MD, Pediatric Otolaryngologist at Arkansas Children’s Hospital

Meet this week’s #womancrushwednesday, Dr. Abby Nolder, MD, a fellowship-trained pediatric otolaryngologist at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock, AR. She is a teacher, mentor, and a role model for all aspiring women surgeons!

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“Don’t get caught up in society’s idea of what a woman surgeon/physician/professional’s life should look like. Pave your own way and make life what you want it to be.” – Dr. Abby Nolder, MD

Name:  Abby Nolder, MD
Specialty: Pediatric Otolaryngology*
Undergraduate education: University of Arkansas
Medical school: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 2002-06
Residency: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 2006-11
Fellowship: University of Kansas, Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, MO 2011-12
Hometown: Little Rock, AR

Tell us about yourself?
I was born in Wichita, Kansas, but moved to Little Rock with my mom, dad, and older brother when I was 2 years old. I am close to my family and am blessed to have them nearby. I got married last year and we have two 9-year old fur babies-a black lab and a golden retriever. My husband is a general surgeon so we stay busy!

What are some fun facts about you?
– I knew I wanted to be a doctor when I was only 8 years old. I used to read medical dictionaries for fun!
– I did sinus surgery on a chimpanzee at the Little Rock Zoo in 2015. It was an awesome experience!

What do you love about surgery? Your field?
I love the variety and pace of surgery and have always felt at home in the operating room. I chose Pediatric ENT because it stimulates and challenges me like no other specialty in otolaryngology. No two days are the same! Serving my pediatric patients is my greatest honor and privilege.

Did you have a career before medical school?
I worked as an operating room tech for one year between college and medical school. I had no prior experience and my boss took a chance on me. It was one of the best years of my life!

What brought you to LR?
My family. Little Rock is home.

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?
I’m an introvert at heart so I love quiet nights at home with my husband. I am also a Pure Barre addict and try to go any chance that I get!

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?
– Don’t get caught up in society’s idea of what a woman surgeon/physician/professional’s life should look like. Pave your own way and make life what you want it to be.
– Remember to take time for yourself as well as unplug and be present with those that love you and have helped you make it this far.

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* What is otolaryngology?
According to the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery: “Otolaryngology (pronounced oh/toe/lair/in/goll/oh/jee) is the oldest medical specialty in the United States. Otolaryngologists are physicians trained in the medical and surgical management and treatment of patients with diseases and disorders of the ear, nose, throat (ENT), and related structures of the head and neck. They are commonly referred to as ENT physicians.” Click here to learn more

 

Dr. Katie Kimbrough, MD, UAMS Trauma Surgeon

Introducing our first #womancrushwednesday, Dr. Katie Kimbrough, MD, a fellowship-trained Trauma and Critical Care Surgeon at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS).  She is a mentor, friend, and an inspiration for all women pursuing careers in the surgical fields.

Dr. Katie Kimbrough, MD

“Your compassion is not a weakness, it is your strength.  I was once told I was ‘too nice to be a surgeon’…I hope I can successfully show you that YOU CAN BE BOTH!!”
– Dr. Katie Kimbrough, MD

Name:  Mary Katherine (Katie) Kimbrough
Specialty: Trauma/Acute Care General Surgery/Surgical Critical Care
Undergraduate education: Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA
Medical school: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA
Residency: General Surgery, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA
Fellowship: Surgical Critical Care, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, LA
Hometown: Ruston, LA

Tell us about yourself?  I am a wife, a mom, a surgeon, and a teacher!  I am a Louisiana girl, but moved to Arkansas 4 years ago with my husband and our bulldog Louie.  We have made Arkansas our home, and both of our daughters were born here at UAMS.  We live in Hillcrest and our family loves Hillcrest events like Harvest Fest and the Pumpkin Roll!

What are some fun facts about you?  I met my husband online through eHarmony while I was doing my fellowship in New Orleans!  We met in person for the first time on Ash Wednesday after Mardi Gras in 2011, after we had texted and talked on the phone for several months. I am quite the introvert and I wasn’t really into dating anyone from the hospital, so online dating was the only way for me to meet anyone!

What do you love about surgery? Your field?  I love surgery because of the pace, the chance to think on my feet, and work with my hands.  I love Trauma for the same reasons, and also because the cases are challenging and always different.  Trauma is exciting and although somewhat algorithmic (ABCs!) in our approach to patients, it gives me the chance to think critically about a problem and come up with a solution. Two patients with the exact same injuries might have totally different hospital courses.  I also enjoy the family interaction that I get to do with Trauma and Surgical Critical Care.  We have to establish rapport with the patients and their families very quickly and often in life-threatening situations, and get them to trust us to care for themselves or their loved one.  It’s a tough task, and not for everyone, but it’s worth it when our patients have critical injury/illness and start to recover and how amazing and exciting it is for the families.  And finally, I LOVE my job because of the residents and students I get to work with every day.  It is truly a privilege to come to work and get to mentor and train the next generation of surgeons.  Seeing a resident grow and mature from an intern to a strong, confident chief resident surgeon is one of the highlights of my job.

Did you have a career before medical school? My first real job was as a peach packer at the local peach orchard in Ruston, LA!  I inspected and selected peaches off the assembly line and packed them into the cartons for sale!  The only other jobs I held before medical school were as a girls’ summer softball league umpire and as youth group intern at my church in Ruston, LA!

What brought you to Little Rock?  The job!  Dr. Jason Mizell (a UAMS Colorectal surgeon) is one of my good friends from general surgery residency in Louisiana and he texted me one day after I’d had several bad call nights in a row “Hey we are looking to build the trauma program in Little Rock at UAMS, would you be interested in coming up to interview?”  I came to interview just a few weeks later and the rest is history!

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital?  I like hanging out with my family and spending quality time with my girls (playing, snuggling, going to the zoo, going to the park, etc).  I like reading, watching TV/movies, and traveling!  I love a good road trip, although a road trip with a 3 year old and a 1 year old presents some challenges!!

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons?  Always strive to make the next generation…students, residents, surgeons…better than you.  Be kind, compassionate, and respectful to everyone…treat the CEO of the hospital the same way you treat the janitor of the hospital.  Be resilient…resilience is the strength of understanding your own vulnerability.  Your compassion is not a weakness, it is your strength.  I was once told I was “too nice to be a surgeon”…I hope I can successfully show you that YOU CAN BE BOTH!!

 

 

Dr. Janina B. Bonwich, MD, – General Surgery

Meet our #WomenCrushWednesday – Dr. Nina Bonwich, MD, – General Surgeon at UAMS

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I love the interface between knowing, thinking, and doing that General Surgery provides.

Name:  Nina Bonwich

Specialty: General Surgery

Undergraduate education: BS Music Education (West Chester U of PA)

Graduate education: MMus in Music Theory (University of Michigan, Go BLUE!)

Medical school: Post-Baccalaureate at Penn, Temple University School of Medicine

Residency: UAMS General Surgery

Hometown: Bethlehem, PA

 

Tell us about yourself? I practice General Surgery. The first half of my career was spent in Community Practice in Fort Smith.

What are some fun facts about you? I was a professional musician prior to medical school. I play (at) the bagpipes.

What do you love about surgery? Your field? I love the interface between knowing, thinking, and doing that General Surgery provides. The depth and breadth of a general surgery practice can be staggering and, hence, challenging.

Did you have a career before medical school? I started my first career as musician in the US Marine Corps Band and I have had the privilege to teach at various levels including at the University of Michigan. I spent most of my time as a HS Band and Orchestra Conductor.

What brought you to Little Rock? I matched at UAMS for residency. After graduating and practicing in Fort Smith, I had the opportunity to come back to UAMS on staff.

What do you like to do when you’re not at the hospital? Study and play my bagpipes, read, cook, take pictures, and get beaten at chess.

Do you have some WISE words for women who want to become surgeons? Read and study!